The Federal Circuit on Wednesday reversed Court precedent and long held belief that inter partes review (“IPR”) institution decisions were categorically non-reviewable. The Court, sitting en banc, held that the issue of whether a petitioner is time-barred from filing an IPR petition  under 35 U.S.C. § 315(b) is in fact reviewable.[i]

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In an unprecedented move by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO), the Patent Trials and Appeals Board (PTAB) has permitted the filing of amicus briefs on whether the Saint Regis Mohawk Tribe (“Tribe”) should be permitted to terminate the inter partes review of Allergan’s patents contested in IPR2016-00127, IPR2016-01128, IPR2016-01129, IPR2016-01130, IPR2016-01131, and IPR2016-01132.

The America Invents Act (“AIA”) provides for post grant challenges of U.S. patents in the Patent Trial and Appeal Board (“PTAB”) of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. One type of AIA proceeding, Inter Partes Review (“IPR”), came into effect in September 2012, and provides a process for relatively quick determination of invalidity of challenged patent claims based on published prior art. [1] IPR decisions rendered in the past five years have created a body of law addressing a variety of issues related to invalidity challenges before the PTAB. In a recent IPR proceeding, a novel strategy has arisen that posts an interesting question of first impression, whether the assignment of a patent involved in an IPR proceeding to a U.S. Indian tribe can avoid an IPR proceeding based on a sovereign immunity defense. The present blog post summarizes the new issue that the PTAB will be required to decide in the IPR.
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On April 26, 2016, the Federal Circuit denied a petition for rehearing en banc, filed by Merck and Cie. The Federal Circuit maintained that the “substantial evidence” review standard applies for an appeal from an IPR proceeding. Judge O’Malley, with whom Judges Wallach and Stoll concurred in the denial of the petition, stated that in light of §§ 7 and 144 of Title 35, “we review Board decisions ‘on the record of an agency hearing provided by statute,’ and that we should therefore review Board fact-finding for ‘substantial evidence.’” The court explained its decision to deny the petition, “[i]n light of In re Gartside, [it] has reviewed all of the Board’s factual findings including those in IPRs, for substantial evidence.”
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